Readers ask: When Was Intensive Farming Introduced?

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When did intensive agriculture start?

Beginning about 5,000 years ago, the development of intensive farming methods became necessary as the human population grew in some major river valleys to levels beyond the carrying capacity of the environment using horticulture and pastoralism.

What is intensive farming?

A type of agricultural production system that uses high inputs of fertilizer, pesticides, labour and capital in relation to the size of the land area being farmed.

Where is intensive farming practiced?

Intensive method of agriculture is prevalent in the high population density regions of south-east Asia, e.g., India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Myanmar (Burma), China, Sri Lanka, Indonesia etc. Besides, densely populated Western Europe also practices this type of agriculture.

How has intensive farming developed?

Intensive farming Food production can be increased by growing high-yield crops, removing other plants and pests and adding fertiliser to the soil. Other intensive farming practices include keeping animals indoors, often in restricted spaces. Many of these practices have unwelcome side effects.

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Is intensive farming good or bad?

Intensive, high-yielding agriculture may be the best way to meet growing demand for food while conserving biodiversity, say researchers. Intensive farming is said to create high levels of pollution and damage the environment more than organic farming.

Is intensive or extensive farming better?

Optimal use of these materials and machines produces significantly greater crop yields per unit of land than extensive agriculture, which uses little capital or labour. As a result, a farm using intensive agriculture will require less land than an extensive agriculture farm to produce a similar profit.

Why is intensive farming expensive?

The intensive farming looks at increasing the yield in the given limited land space with a high dependency on fertilizers, labor, and machinery. But as extensive farming is remotely located, the labor cost, the production cost is higher. Also, the output calls for much more care and takes a while to yield the crops.

What is intensive farming in simple words?

Intensive agriculture, also known as intensive farming (as opposed to extensive farming ) and industrial agriculture, is a type of agriculture, both of crop plants and of animals, with higher levels of input and output per unit of agricultural land area.

What is an example of intensive farming?

Crops. Monocropping is a defining feature of intensive plant agriculture. Large areas of land are planted with a single species, such as wheat, corn, or soy, with the latter two used heavily in animal feed.

What are the effects of intensive farming?

Land environmental damage as a result of intensive farming

  • Pesticides and fertilisers.
  • Improper disposal of waste.
  • Livestock & agricultural deforestation and logging.
  • Habitat destruction and degradation.
  • Introduction of chemicals to ecosystems, food chains and environments.
  • Loss of natural resources.
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What are the advantages and disadvantages of intensive farming?

Intensive farming

Advantage Disadvantage
Higher yields Costly additives needed
More efficient use of food Risk of antibiotic resistance
Quality control easier Considered unethical by some people

How can we stop intensive farming?

Fix your food

  1. Shop smart. Choose meat and dairy products from farms, not factories.
  2. Choose local. It makes sense to choose local meat and dairy.
  3. Love leftovers. Wasting less meat and dairy is a simple and cost-effective way to kick-start a food revolution.
  4. Avoid overeating.

Why is intensive animal farming bad?

Some of these disadvantages include mass environmental damage, high levels of pollution, compromised animal welfare, as well as increased public health risks such as zoonotic disease and antibiotic resistance.

Can we ditch intensive farming and still feed the world?

No. There are more than 570m farms worldwide; more than 90% are run by an individual or family and rely primarily on family labour. They produce about 80% of the world’s food. Small farmers will be key to the transition, says Ronald Vargas, soil and land officer at the FAO.

Why is intensive farming important?

Optimal use of these materials and machines produces significantly greater crop yields per unit of land than extensive agriculture, which uses little capital or labour. As a result, a farm using intensive agriculture will require less land than an extensive agriculture farm to produce a similar profit.

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